Whiskey Box Succulent Garden

Using the same foil-lined technique I discovered to use these whiskey boxes for growing seeds, I made a little garden display of succulents today. Varieties chosen based on a short root structure. None of them will outgrow the boxes!
Continue reading

Advertisements

Tension Rod Herb Garden using IKEA FINTORP Cutlery Pots

This project is exactly what it sounds like, and requires no tools! Yay! All you need is:

A tension rod

IKEA FINTORP cutlery caddies (which have drainage plates already

A package of hooks for that system

Some plants

415LlEyst9L

Then you put them all together in your window, see? So easy. This was extra easy for me because I have a lot of tension  rods lying around from when I had curtains instead of roller shades. They were a little too expensive to throw out, so I had them all in the shed just waiting patiently! Another great use for one ended up putting it under the sink to hang spray bottles.

IMG_0806As an added bonus my plants are mostly out of reach from the cats. Since these herbs (cilantro, sage, and orange thyme) are all technically pet-safe and non-toxic it isn’t the most important thing, except for of course I would like there to be a few herbs left for me! I previously had a greenhouse in this window to protect them as babies, which is going bye-bye so I can turn this shelf into a 2-seater bar! Until next time…

Old Door Love Part Two

Today I started on my “old door” project.  You might remember my musings on what to do with the old doors Daniel and I found randomly all in one week. I had never exactly decided, so working on it today was completely unexpected. I started by watering the plants, which led to washing my car, which led to spraying the old doors, which led to paint chipping off. And then I really got serious.

I love the way paint looks when it is chipped off in layers – the randomness, the contrast between the different colors. This old door has been painted a lot!
I started with a heavy jet stream from the hose to loosen what was already bubbled from age and used a paint scraper to remove that first. It came off easier than the sticker on a peanut butter jar!
When I was finished with everything that came easily, I scraped along all the edges, to give it a uniformly weathered look. Now since this door is old, there’s a chance the paint could have lead. So I kept it very wet while working, and when everything dries I will vacuum up the chips while wearing a painting mask, and then fill the vacuum cleaner reservoir with water to dump it. This is my home-grown way of minimizing the chance of inhaling dust, but if you’re going to try this I’m sure there are safer ways!
 The goal with this particular door is to add little white shelves with cast iron brackets and use it as a plant stand.I may eventually use a high gloss clear coat on the whole door, to keep it from rotting outside,
and to hold onto that wet, high gloss look!

Sponge Planter

The kitchen sink is always an area that can use improvement.
Here I have found use for a planter as a sponge holder!

The water drains out the bottom and evaporates; the sponges are happy, I am happy, and the plants I don’t put in that planter are happy. Everyone wins!